40 Reasons Why Cats Are Better Than Kids

Funnier In Writing

When I met my husband over eight years ago, we each had two cats – mine were female and his were male. We fell in love and, upon combining our households, became the feline version of the Brady Bunch – except I had slightly better hair than Carol Brady and our backyard wasn’t covered in astro turf. Like the Brady’s, our kitties bunked together, fought frequently over who got to use the clubhouse, and shared a single bathroom.

When we married five years later, we decided against breeding (kids, not cats) after weighing the pros and cons of Kids vs. Kitties. The Kitties won and here’s why:

1) Fur hides bruises better than makeup. (No, I don’t beat my cats. I find whisking makes them fluffier.)

2) Though socially unacceptable in the United States, it’s not illegal to kill and eat your felines if facing starvation. Do that with your…

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No-Kill Policy?

I like hero that have strong sense of morality. Really. But… I have problem with character that have over-the-top “no-kill” policy.

I remember several character from show like that. Take character A (initial) for example. A is a rookie police woman with strong moral code. She’s a bit naive, but it’s okay since she’s a rookie. She’s also smart and have perfect score at test. She’s an excellent shooter too! Sadly, the narrative didn’t treat her like that. She will do something like this:

1) The main villain captured Y, her friend. The only way to save Y is kill the villain. But, A hesitant to shoot the villain because afraid it will kill him. So, for the rest of episode, I must watch the villain torture Y while A do NOTHING. Just watch. Well, she tried to shoot but it missed. I found it weird since she’s supposed to be excellent shooter. And finally…. the villain kill Y and walk away. Will will A do? Chase the villain and captured him? I wish. She’s too shocked to do anything. Even to to chase the villain or checking Y.

2) A and her friend finally captured the villain. Before fainted, her friend begged her to kill the villain since the villain is ~special~ and the law cannot punish him. If he’s captured alive, there’s a chance he will escape and kill more people since he’s genius criminal mastermind. What will A do? She ignore her friend request because killing is bad. The result? The villain escape AND kill more people including her friends (again).

Despite that, I don’t hate A. I like her passion plus she’s do good job at the end of show. I understand her reaction. Killing people, even for self-defense is scary. BUT she’s a police woman. And it’s her friend that being captured. Her friend, a helpless injured woman, crying and begged “Please save me, A. I don’t want die.” And A just let her die even though she have chance to save her *sigh*

How to Better Represent Women in Superhero Comics in 4 Easy Steps

Bad Salad

by Laura O’Brien

There’s a good chance you’ve seen a superhero movie recently.

Superhero movies have been doing pretty well at the box office lately. The Avengers is currently the third highest box office earner of all time, grossing more than $1.5bn. The Dark Knight Rises isn’t too far behind at number 7 with earnings of $1.078bn.

Now, I’ve not completed that much in-depth research on the matter, but there may be a chance that there were some women present in that audience. Which may even suggest that – zounds! – women may be interested in the exciting stories of super heroes and their thrilling adventures!

Of course, if you want to read more about these heroes, the best place to go would be to their source material – comic books. That said, this medium has had the unfortunate image of appealing mainly to geeky male children or teenagers.

What…

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